Emma McBryde
Emma McBryde
MBBS, FRACP, MBiostat, PhD
Professor of Infectious Diseases Modelling and Epidemiology
Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University
Emma McBryde is an infectious diseases physician who did her PhD in mathematics; specifically Mathematical and Statistical modelling of disease transmission in hospitals. Since then, she has moved into modelling infectious diseases of global significance, including influenza, SARS and tuberculosis. Emma has led consultancies for AusAID, DFAT, and been involved in consultancies for the Commonwealth Department of Health and participated in Gates funded work on modelling to guide policy in tuberculosis. She is developing work on allocative efficiency for tuberculosis program development in partnership with the Global Fund and the World Bank.

In July 2015, Emma moved to Townsville from Melbourne, leaving the position of Head of Epidemiology at the Victorian Infectious Diseases Service to take up the position of Professor of Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Modelling at the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine. She continues to collaborate with many researchers in Melbourne across University of Melbourne, Monash University and the Burnet Institute and is now linking to new collaborators in the Tropics; across James Cook University and further afield with regional partners.
James Trauer
James Trauer
MBBS, BA, MPH, FRACP, FAFPHM, PhD
Respiratory and Public Health Physician
Infectious Diseases Modeller
School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University
James is a practising respiratory, sleep, general and public health physician, currently finalising a PhD in tuberculosis modelling through the Burnet Institute.

He is currently senior lecturer at Monash School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, as well as Epidemiologist and Public Health Physician for the Victorian Tuberculosis Program at the Peter Doherty Institute. He has experience in the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in both Victoria and the Northern Territory.
Tan Doan
Tan Doan
PhD
Pharmacist
Infectious Diseases Modeller
Dept. of Medicine and Radiology, University of Melbourne
Tan Doan is a Research Fellow in the Department of Medicine and Radiology at the University of Melbourne. Tan holds a PhD in pharmacy and mathematical modelling from Monash University, Australia.

Tan is an academic pharmacist and a mathematical modeller with research interests spanning from transmission dynamic modelling of infectious diseases, particularly Tuberculosis and hospital-acquired infections, to health economics, pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics and pharmacy practice.
Romain Ragonnet
Romain Ragonnet
M.Sc., PhD Student
Mathematician
Infectious Diseases Modeller
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne
Romain Ragonnet is a mathematician and infectious diseases modeller and is currently doing a PhD in tuberculosis modelling.

Originally from France, he has worked at the INSERM institute of Paris, investigating the dynamics of the spontaneous clearance of the hepatitis C virus in HIV-HCV co-infected individuals. In 2014, he worked as a research assistant at the Burnet Institute where his main project was a comparison between real and apparent impacts of vaccines against endemic infections.

In 2015, Romain was the principal investigator on a project supported by the TB Modelling and Analysis Consortium (TB-MAC), studying the impact of tuberculosis incidence on the effectiveness of the isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). He started a PhD with the University of Melbourne in November 2015.
Nick Scott
Nick Scott
PhD
Econometrician
Infectious Diseases Modeller
Centre for Population Health, Burnet Institute
Nick is an Econometrician who uses mathematical, economic and statistical models to inform public health policy in order to better target health interventions among vulnerable populations. Some examples include:
  • Econometric, regression, and Markov models to understand the behavioural responses of marginalized populations
  • Deterministic transmission models of infectious diseases
  • Cost-effectiveness models investigating the impact of treatment and estimating the future burden of diseases
  • Intervention models to predict the benefits vaccines
  • Agent-based stochastic models for performing policy experiments
  • An allocative efficiency model as part of the ‘Optima’ collaboration
Justin Denholm
Justin Denholm
BMed, MBioethics, MPH+TM, PhD, FRACP
Medical Director
Victorian Tuberculosis Program
A/Prof Justin Denholm is an infectious diseases physician and ethicist, based at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in Victoria, Australia. He is the Medical Director of the Victorian Tuberculosis Program, and is actively involved in clinical and epidemiologic research and supervision. He is the immediate past Chair of the Australasian Tuberculosis Forum, and co-Chair of the Ethics Advisory Group of the International Union against TB and Lung Disease. Justin has an active research program in ethical issues related to tuberculosis in society, including public health policy, screening programs and isolation. He has a particular interest in ethical issues related to latent tuberculosis infection, and in both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of strategies towards the global elimination of TB.
Michael Meehan
Michael Meehan
PhD
Mathematical modeller
Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University
Michael Meehan is a mathematical modeller within the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine (AITHM) at James Cook University. Michael models the spread of infectious diseases with a particular focus on TB in the Asia-Pacific region. Combining analytical and numerical methods, Michael attempts to determine not only the underlying dynamics driving TB transmission but also to identify the most effective and economical intervention policies.

Prior to his appointment at AITHM, Michael received his PhD from the school of Engineering at James Cook University. His research in theoretical astrophysics and cosmology focused on the outstanding problem of the nature of dark matter and dark energy and their relationship in alternative cosmological models.
Debebe Shaweno
Debebe Shaweno
MPH, PhD Student
Epidemiologist
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne
Debebe is a PhD student at the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, the University of Melbourne. His study aims to integrate spatio-temporal TB models with mathematical TB transmission dynamic models to inform TB interventions in Ethiopia.

Debebe has a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology. Before he joined the University of Melbourne, he worked as a lecturer of Communicable Disease Epidemiology, Institutional Review Board Member, and Health Systems Research and Application Module team leader at Hawassa University, Ethiopia. His previous areas of research include epidemiological studies on non-communicable diseases (stroke, epilepsy), maternal and child health; and communicable diseases (TB, Measles, HIV)
Yayehirad Alemu Melsew
Yayehirad Alemu Melsew
MPH, PhD student
Epidemiologist
School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University
Yayehirad is a PhD student at the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, MONASH University. His study aims investigating heterogeneity of TB with mathematical models.

Yayehirad has a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Before he joined MONASH University, he worked as a lecturer at University of Gondar, Ethiopia. His previous areas of research include epidemiological studies on communicable diseases (HIV, Intestinal parasitosis), Reproductive health and Nutrition.
Abdul Kuddus
Abdul Kuddus
M.Sc., MPH, PhD student
Mathematician
Infectious Diseases Modeller
Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University
Abdul Kuddus is a PhD student at the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University. His study aims to combine mathematical models of tuberculosis transmission with pharmacological models (PK-PD) and evolution models of acquired drug resistance to determine the optimal deployment of novel and emerging drugs for tuberculosis.

Abdul has one Master in Applied Mathematics and another Master in Public Health which is Global Health. Before he joined as a PhD student in James Cook University, he worked as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. His previous areas of research include infectious diseases modelling.